More Maps–Further Explorations with ArcGIS Online

screen-shot-2016-09-26-at-1-02-15-pmSo far this month we’ve explored how to create digital pedagogy projects using both Google My Maps and Story Maps Journal. This week we’ll conclude our month of focusing on spatial literacy and digital mapping with a more in-depth introduction to GIS, or Geographical Information Systems. Specifically, we’ll discuss what you can do with a free public account at ArcGIS Online.

ArcGIS, the most widely used resource in digital mapping, is actually a suite of applications of varying degrees of accessibility and complexity. The desktop version of the program is installed in a number of the computer labs at Austin College. The web-based version, ArcGIS Online, is accessed through a browser. There are subscription-based organizational accounts, but also a free version that is referred to as a “public” account. Though some of the advanced analytic and visualization feature are only available via subscription, the free public account offers a quite robust set of features that is worth becoming familiar with. The Story Maps journal application is one such feature. However, there are many other ways that you can incorporate maps and spatially-referenced content into your teaching and research outside of the Story Maps platform. We’ll take some time in this week’s workshops for conversation and exploration of some possibilities.

Meanwhile, here’s a quick start guide on using ArcGIS Online with a free public account:

Digital Pedagogy Johnson Center Lunches–March 5, 19

johnson centerBernice Melvin, Director of the Johnson Center for Faculty Development and Excellence in Teaching, has graciously offered DP@AC two Thursday lunch periods for March. We’re kicking around some ideas for discussion, but we’d like to hear from faculty…what issues and topics related to digital pedagogy would you like to discuss and hear more about? We interpret “digital pedagogy” pretty broadly, so if you’ve got any thoughts or suggestions, post a comment and let us know.

Several Points of Contact in the New NMC Horizon Report

nmc_itunesu.HR2015-170x170This year’s New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Report just came out last week, and there are some intriguing points of intersection with the trends they identify and digital pedagogy practices and initiatives we’re interested in @AC.

For example, NMC identifies six trends accelerating higher ed tech adoption in the next few, including “Increased Use of Blended Learning,” “Redesigning Learning Spaces,” and “Increasing Cross-Institution Collaboration.” Each of these figures prominently either in the structure of the Mellon Digital Pedagogy grant itself and as a topic of conversation at Johnson Center workshops and lunches, around campus, or both. Of the challenges impeding adoption, “Improving Digital Literacy” and “Teaching Complex Thinking” are both issues we have been dealing with for several years if not longer.

Among the other developments highlighted, flipped classrooms and makerspaces are both concepts that have been much discussed of late. Makerspaces, in particular, are an early focus of this blog, and chemistry professor Andy Carr’s flipped classroom experiments are supported directly by the Mellon Digital Pedagogy grant.

I’ll have to agree with NMC that these issues will be prominent ones to watch at we move deeper into 2015.

Hello world!

Welcome to the blog and website for academic technology at Austin College. We hope this becomes a place where faculty and students at AC can find and share ideas and inspiration about improving teaching and learning with digital technologies. Thanks to a generous Mellon Foundation grant, “Collaborative Pedagogies for a Digital Age,” we are increasing our support for innovative projects in the Austin College academic community.

Our vision is to make this website a hub for the exchange of ideas and a space for experimentation and discovery. We’ll bring you relevant articles and resources from the wider world of higher education as well as news and features on local projects and activities. We hope this can be a space where genuine conversation about learning, pedagogy, and technology will augment our academic community. So we encourage you to give us suggestions and ideas, to comment posts, and to help us make this a resource that we can all benefit from.

We’ll be adding features to the website over time…for now, we’ll mostly be blogging about current trends and issues in pedagogy and digital technology, but our long term goal is to offer you resources and webspace to try new applications and to share projects with your colleagues. You can receive notifications of new posts and activities on the site via email updates, our Twitter and Facebook feeds, or through an RSS feedreader.

Above all, we’re here to help…let us know what we can do for you.

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